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As a self-taught visual artist, I have never made preliminary sketches, drafts, learned to follow discipline logic, or succumb to pressure from an audience to conform to stereotypes about what a black female artist should create, how to create it or what it should look like. The pieces I create are a vibrant and expressive celebration of women and designed to penetrate into a deeper layer of universal unconscious that lies beneath the contemporary concious mind. Moreover, the real strength of my work lies in overcoming preconceived notions of what art is supposed to be, and to dismiss misconceptions that the idea of African American art is strange or incomprehensible.Through my work I translate viewers into an intimate otherworldliness while revitalizing awareness and perspective of a black woman’s strength, wisdom, energy, perseverance, determination and beauty.

Although my pieces do not necessarily contain Afrocentric themes they do include some of the main stages of life found in African/African American art: ceremonial rituals, innocence, fertility, sacrifice, the body in nature, personal rediscovery as well as re-evaluations and definitions of self. Recurring themes often include stylized representations of women as insects, birds, water, fairies, planetary bodies, plants, fire and various forms of sea-life. I believe my work has originality and is the most eloquent statement I can make.

I often ask myself, Who is the Caretaker, the Goddess, the Matriarch, the Mother, the Healer, the Soul Catcher? What does she look like?

Through my paintings the answers are clear.

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